Tag Archives: prejudice
13 Feb

Heather MacAllistar is one of my heroes.  She was the Artistic Director of The Original Fat-Bottom Revue.  She was at the forefront of the Fat Acceptance movement, and sadly she passed away of Ovarian Cancer four years ago today.  I never got to see her perform live, but her story is so inspiring and instrumental to how I feel about being sexy at any size.

Heather said:

Any time there is a fat person onstage as anything besides the butt of a joke, it’s political.  Add physical movement, then dance, then sexuality, and you have a revolutionary act.


This picture was shot by Mr. Spock, himself, Leonard Nimoy.  A few years back, Mr. Nimoy created The Full Body Project, where he photographed Heather and her burlesque troupe.  As part of his artistic statement Mr. Nimoy says:

These women are projecting an image that is their own. And one that also stems from their own story rather than mine. Their self-esteem is strong. One of them has a degree in anthropology and will tell you that ideas of beauty and sexuality are “culture bound”—that these ideas are not universal or fixed, and that they vary and fluctuate depending on place and time. They will tell you that too many people suffer because the body they live in is not the body you find in the fashion magazines.

The most important part of this statement is, “Their self-esteem is strong.” What American society does is stigmatize fat people.  This begins at a very early age.  One stigmatizes to elevate one’s own status.  It makes one feel better to put others down.  What this movement is about is empowerment.  It shows the rest of the world that we’re here, we are a part of society – not its pariahs – and you better get use to it.

22 Jan

There’s a big debate right now about we who blog about fat acceptance. Commenters and other bloggers think I’m pushing fat to be the norm. On the contrary, I am pushing for you to be you. If you’re thin, be thin. If you’re fat, be fat. But, don’t let someone stigmatize you for it. If there’s one thing I’ve learned, I don’t need to have other people telling me what is good or bad for my body (thank you very much, Judith Angel). You don’t live in this body. I do. Only I know how I feel emotionally, physically, and spiritually. How I live is between me and my God. You don’t have to understand it. Just accept it.

Far be it from me to push how I live on others. I said this about feederism, and I’ll say it about my current lifestyle – different strokes for different folks.

I do consider myself an activist. This is where the two become one. When I present myself as a Fat Activist, that means I’m advocating for anyone who has been called names, been turned down from a job because they’re too big, or seen any other kind of prejudice because of weight. I’m encouraging people to be healthy at any size.

Heath at Every Size (HAES) is an amazing way of viewing life. It’s about being healthy and heavy. Yes, you can be. It doesn’t mean you have to lose those 10 pounds, if you’re active and eating well. Some people can’t shed the pounds. That’s how they’re made.

Basic Principles of Health At Every SizeSM

1. Accepting and respecting the diversity of body shapes and sizes.

2. Recognizing that health and well-being are multi-dimensional and that they include
physical, social, spiritual, occupational, emotional, and intellectual aspects.

3. Promoting all aspects of health and well-being for people of all sizes.

4. Promoting eating in a manner which balances individual nutritional needs, hunger,
satiety, appetite, and pleasure.

5. Promoting individually appropriate, enjoyable, life-enhancing physical activity, rather
than exercise that is focused on a goal of weight loss.

So do I want to be accepted for who I am? Heck, yeah. And, I’m going to advocate for that acceptance.

To All the Haters

2 Oct

There have been a mixed bag of reactions to me starting this blog here, and I need to clarify a few things:

1. I am not anti-feederism.  I am not pro-feederism.  I am pro-me.  I am living my life the way I will live it, and this is my choice.  You may have another choice.  You may not feel like you have a choice.  To me, this is the most important thing to realize: people live how they live because of many factors.  Nature or nurture.  It’s a toss up which is stronger.  It’s clear both are a factor.  Most people can’t really change the first.  And, the latter is a *itch to tackle.  Some habits take a lifetime to alter.

2. For the many of you asking: No, I haven’t spoken to Noel yet.  I know many of you are friends of ours (his), and you think I screwed him.  If you know me, you know that wasn’t my intention.  I never wanted to hurt any of my friends in the feederism community, and I most definitely didn’t mean to hurt Noel.  I made a big decision over a year ago, and it’s changed my life.  I’m just now seeing how I could have made better choices.
Hindsight = 20/20

3. If you don’t like what I’m writing about here, you don’t have to read.  I’m not going to post pictures of myself.  That isn’t me anymore.  If, on the other hand, you wish to create a new community supporting fat people, fat acceptance and fight prejudice, I’m here.  Join me.

Sorry if I’m a bit curt in this post, but I just can’t stand it when people tell me I don’t have good intentions.  People don’t know what my intentions are.  Keep reading, and you’ll figure it out.